Indian Blog
Search India Hindi Movies
Cheap Tickets to India
Home                                                         Bollywood Hindi Movie Reviews - Banaras
Categories
Amazing America
America
Android
Arts
Auto
Bollywood
Books
Box Office
Business
Cloud Computing
Cricket
Diaspora
Digital Media
Economy
English
Food
Foreign Movies
Gandhi
General
Health
Hollywood
Humor
Immigration
Incredible India
iPhone
IT Industry
Legal
Linux
Liquor
Malayalam
Microsoft
Music
NYC
Pakistan
People
Photography
Pictures
Politics
Religion
Reviews
Science
Smartphones
Sports
Startups
Tablets
Tamil Movies
Telugu Movies
Terrorism
Tourism
TV
Weird Stuff
Banaras
(Scroll down to read the review)

New Bollywood Movies

2 States
Action Jackson
Bang Bang
Besharam
Boss
Bullett Raja
Chennai Express
Dhoom 3
Entertainment
Finding Fanny
Go Goa Gone
Gunday
Highway
Himmatwala
Humshakals
Jai Ho
Krrish 3
Lootera
Mardaani
PK
OUATIMD
Race 2
Raanjhanaa
Ram Leela
Singham Returns
Special 26
Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani
Zanjeer

Other Movie Reviews
Hindi Movies
Hollywood Movies
Tamil Movies
Telugu Movies
Kannada Movies
Malayalam Movies

Banaras
Reviewer's Summary - Average

Language: Hindi
Year: 2006
Actors: Urmila Matondkar, Ashmit Patel, Raj Babbar, Dimple Kapadia, Naseeruddin Shah
Director: Pankuj Parashar
Producer: Swati Singh, Manorama Singh
Story: L.C.Singh
Music: Himmesh Reshammiya
Lyrics: Sameer
Screenplay: L.C.Singh, Javed Siddiqui
Dialogs: Javed Siddiqui

Mercifully, Banaras is different from the usual Bollywood trash but still left us a little disappointed.

Set in the ancient North Indian holy city of Banaras, the movie centers around the character of a young girl Shwetambari (Urmila Matondkar) who falls in love with a low caste boy Soham (Ashmit Patel).

An abandoned child who had been raised by a low caste sweeper woman, the spiritually-inclined Soham turns out to be a fine classical singer and is appointed as a music teacher in the Banaras Hindu University.

Shwetambari's relationship with Soham arouses intense opposition from her rich, upper caste parents Mahendranath (Raj Babbar) and Gayatri (Dimple Kapadia) as well as some other citizens in the city.

However, the parents seem to acquiesce to the relationship and even participate in a grand engagement ceremony.

But the stars are not aligned right for the young pair as Soham is murdered soon after the engagement.

A distraught Shwetambari is inconsolable. Even foreign-trained psychiatrists cannot help to bring her out of her grief.

After accidentally overhearing that even after the engagement her father was behind the scene pressurizing Soham to end the relationship, Shwetambari forsakes her parents and the city she dearly loves. She travels around the world and becomes a renowned spiritual figure.

Years pass and her father, now on his deathbed, wishes to see her before he breathes his last. Word is sent to Shwetambari about her father's ill health. She comes home and the audience then learns of the shocking truth of Soham's murder.

The movie falls short in several ways. While offbeat, the story is not richly layered. It tends to the superficial in not adequately exploring the caste compulsions or the unique draw of Banaras for millions of Hindus.

Urmila Matondkar tends to overact but Ashmit Patel renders a fine job in what is essentially a heroine-dominated film. Naseeruddin Shah as the saint Baba gives no cause for complaint.

The songs are alright but unlikely to have a lingering impact.

In his previous avatar, L.C.Singh, the writer and a driving force behind this movie was an information technology executive. - Copyright SearchIndia.com.


About us    Advertise    Disclaimer    Privacy    © 2018, All Rights Reserved