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Aug 112012
 



On the few occasions I’ve watched Fareed Zakaria’s show on CNN, I’ve hated the bozo.

His weekly shows on CNN are awful, even for those like yours truly who love to watch an Indian face on TV in America.

Unlike my favorite yesteryear ABC journalist and TV host Sam Donaldson, Fareed Zakaria behaves like a pussy with guests on his show.

In my not so humble opinion, Fareed Zakaria’s biggest blunder as a TV host – he forgets that the relationship between the media and the people it covers is always adversarial.

But Fareed Zakaria now stands exposed of a bigger crime – stealing or to use a fancy English word plagiarism.

Media circles in the U.S. were abuzz yesterday that Fareed Zakaria had plagiarized from New Yorker writer Jill Lepore’s article on the blog he writes for Time.

CNN and Time magazine, where Fareed has gigs, have suspended the thief. Fareed is the host of Fareed Zakaria GPS on CNN and Editor-at-Large of Time.

Fareed has already admitted to the theft.

Here’s Fareed Zakaria’s confession:

Media reporters have pointed out that paragraphs in my Time column this week bear close similarities to paragraphs in Jill Lepore’s essay in the April 23rd issue of The New Yorker. They are right. I made a terrible mistake. It is a serious lapse and one that is entirely my fault. I apologize unreservedly to her, to my editors at Time, and to my readers.

Fareed Zakaria Admits He Stole from Jill Lepore's Article - SearchIndia.comFareed Zakaria – Face of the Thief
(Pix: Atlantic Wire)

Several sites including Politico, Atlantic, NRANews, News Busters etc have run excerpts of Fareed’s plagiarism.

The below excerpts are from Politico:

Jill Lepore’s New Yorker piece:

As Adam Winkler, a constitutional-law scholar at U.C.L.A., demonstrates in a remarkably nuanced new book, “Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America,” firearms have been regulated in the United States from the start. Laws banning the carrying of concealed weapons were passed in Kentucky and Louisiana in 1813, and other states soon followed: Indiana (1820), Tennessee and Virginia (1838), Alabama (1839), and Ohio (1859). Similar laws were passed in Texas, Florida, and Oklahoma. As the governor of Texas explained in 1893, the “mission of the concealed deadly weapon is murder. To check it is the duty of every self-respecting, law-abiding man.

Fareed Zakaria’s Time column:

Adam Winkler, a professor of constitutional law at UCLA, documents the actual history in Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America. Guns were regulated in the U.S. from the earliest years of the Republic. Laws that banned the carrying of concealed weapons were passed in Kentucky and Louisiana in 1813. Other states soon followed: Indiana in 1820, Tennessee and Virginia in 1838, Alabama in 1839 and Ohio in 1859. Similar laws were passed in Texas, Florida and Oklahoma. As the governor of Texas (Texas!) explained in 1893, the “mission of the concealed deadly weapon is murder. To check it is the duty of every self-respecting, law-abiding man.”

Fareed Zakaria is a high-profile figure in the U.S. and reportedly collects $75,000 for a speech (Source: Huffington Post).

I hope CNN and Time boot Fareed out for good!

That’d teach the stealing bozo a lesson he’ll never forget.

Fareed Zakaria is the son of the late Congress Member of Parliament Rafiq Zakaria from the western Indian state of Maharashtra.

Related Content/Sources:
** Stolen ShitThe Case for Gun Control**
Fareed Zakaria Apologizes for ‘Lapse'; Faces Time and CNN Suspensions
Fareed Zakaria apologizes for plagiarism
Fareed Zakaria’s Harvard, Duke speeches identical
The New Newsweek, Now With Less Reporting